Fort Davis

by Bonnie Tate

I took many, many photos of this impressive frontier fort named for Jefferson Davis. It stretches back into a canyon and has rocky hills towering over it. We hiked up into the hills to view Fort Davis from above, as Apache Indians would have done in 1854 – the year the fort was built. Until the start of the Civil War U.S. Infantry troops posted at Fort Davis protected settlers, travelers, and mail coaches en route between San Antonio and El Paso. That first road – a rutted dirt path – is still visible at the fort…

After Texas’s secession from the Union Fort Davis was abandoned. In 1862 it was occupied briefly by the Confederates, and then again abandoned. When the war ended Fort Davis took up its original role again – safeguarding against Comanches and Apaches – until 1891 when it was deserted a final time. 

We took our time roaming through the dusty, silent buildings. Every now and then bugle calls rang out over a loudspeaker in spurts of eerie liveliness…

 

Road to the Barracks

Road to the Barracks

Officer's Quarters

Officer's Quarters

 

Officer's Quarters, Rear Window

Officer's Quarters, Rear Window

 

Inside an Officer's House

Children's Room Inside an Officer's House

 

Clothesline

Clothesline

 

Chapel and Junior Officer's Quarters

Chapel and Junior Officer's Quarters

Chapel Ruins

Chapel Ruins

 

Ira Durham, Graffiti Inside Hospital

Ira Durham, Graffiti Inside Hospital

J.W. + Debbie, Graffiti on Hospital Room Wall

J.W. + Debbie, Graffiti on Hospital Room Wall

 

Junior Officer's House and Cactus

Junior Officer's House and Cactus

Barracks from Above

Barracks from Above

 

Ruins from Above

Ruins from Above

 

Junior Officer's Quarters From Above

Junior Officer's Quarters From Above

Advertisements